Breaking the Silence

Website for the American Mental Health Counselors Association's Breaking the Silence initiative to address mental health stigma.


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Learning to Forgive Ourselves and Others

from contributing author Dr. Betty Hughes

The purpose of this article is to briefly highlight the importance of forgiveness as part of the counseling process. For many people, learning to forgive may need to come after intensive psychotherapy regarding memories. Forgiveness work may then help to release any remaining negative energy so that the client can learn to function at a healthier level. Holding grievances takes more energy than we realize until we let it go.

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Human Trafficking

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

Would you take a moment and look up the phrase human trafficking on the internet? Don’t be afraid. I promise you the FBI won’t show up at your door and ask any questions.

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Our Elder Orphans

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

“It’s paradoxical that the idea of living a long life appeals to everyone, but the idea of getting old doesn’t appeal to anyone.” ― Andy Rooney

Yesterday was Christmas Day or at least that’s what the calendar showed. Before 1991, Miss Lib has celebrated Christmas and all the other holidays with her husband and family members. After her husband’s death in 1992, her children left the house. 25 years later, Miss Lib, now 83 yrs old rarely leaves her own home. Coming of age in the Great Depression and WWII, Lib learned self-reliance and fortitude.  Lib’s husband of many years died over two decades ago and her three adult children live over an hour’s drive away and seldom visit.

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Depression

By contributing blogger Dr. Keith Mobley

We often hear our friends or family say they feel “depressed”, conveying they feel sad about a situation or event. While sadness is definitely a part of clinical depression, it’s a small part of a genuine and serious illness that is more than sad emotions or a phase, but may actually affect functioning. Some signs of depressive illness, which may vary in degree and combination for each individual, are:

  • feeling a lack of energy or motivation to engage in typical activities
  • loss of interest, enjoyment or pleasure in the usual things
  • changes in behavior, such as moving or talking slower than usual or even becoming fidgety, irritable, or restless
  • feeling sad, anxious, or empty
  • noticeable changes in appetite – either poor appetite or overeating
  • noticeable changes in sleep – either staying asleep or having trouble falling or staying asleep
  • feeling guilt, worthlessness or hopelessness
  • trouble concentrating, including the simple ones
  • thoughts or mentions of suicide

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October 6, 2016 is National Depression and Anxiety Screening Day

By contributing blogger Dr. Keith Mobley

National Depression Screening Day began in 1990 by the U.S. Congress with the awareness that there is no health without mental health and that about 1 in 4 adults – 26.2% to be exact – suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. The recognition of a national screening day was compelled by the advocacy of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) to bring awareness and educate Americans on some relatively common, serious, yet treatable mental health disorders.

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