Breaking the Silence

Website for the American Mental Health Counselors Association's Breaking the Silence initiative to address mental health stigma.


Leave a comment

Five Myths About Mental Illness and the Workplace

If you’ve held a job or two, you’ve probably worked with someone who had a mental illness. Surprised? Here are some major myths—and facts—about the impact of mental illness on the workplace.

Myth 1: Mental illness is the same as mental retardation.

Facts: Mental illness and intellectual disability are two distinct disorders. A diagnosis of intellectual disability is chiefly characterized by limitation in intellectual functioning as well as difficulties with certain daily living skills. In contrast, among those with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual functioning varies, just as it does across the general population.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Recognizing Common Mental Health Problems in the Workplace

By contributing blogger Joel E. Miller

Here’s a brief guide to the most common mental health problems in the workplace, and how they affect both employees and employers.

Symptoms of these common problems—depression, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and anxiety—are all described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). But symptoms tend to manifest differently at work than they do at home or in other settings.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Addressing Mental Health in the Workplace Is Imperative for Healthier—and More Productive—Employees

By contributing blogger Joel E. Miller

Five of the 10 leading causes of disability are mental health problems: major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, alcohol use, and obsessive-compulsive disorders. These disorders—together with anxiety, depression, and stress—have a debilitating impact in the workplace and need to be addressed.

Unfortunately, even though numerous affordable interventions exist, mental health and the stigma that those with mental health disorders still endure are given a low priority in the modern workplace.

Clinical mental health counselors (CMHCs) can play a critically important role in helping companies’ address their needs to make mental health treatment available to employees.

Savvy employers recognize that mental disabilities represent more than a health care issue. Employee performance, rates of illness, absenteeism, accidents, and staff turnover are all affected by employees’ mental health. In the United States, estimates for national spending on depression alone is nearly $40 billion, with an estimated 220 million days lost from work each year.

The impact of mental health problems in the workplace has serious consequences, not only for individuals struggling with mental health issues, but also for the productivity of the enterprise.

Continue reading