Breaking the Silence

Website for the American Mental Health Counselors Association's Breaking the Silence initiative to address mental health stigma.


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My Grandfather

By contributing blogger Dr. LaMarr Edgerson

During this month, as we celebrate Father’s Day, I think of my grandfather. He was the primary father figure in my life as I grew up. My grandpa was the strongest man I’ve ever known. He served as an Army enlisted man during World War II and somehow made it through the entire conflict without a scratch. After discharging he moved his wife and five children from the South to the North, then took a blue-collar job for the Chrysler Corp until he was of age to retire. Being approximately 6’3, at least 225 pounds, hard as nails and with an overbearing personality, my grandfather could be a very intimidating figure. When he spoke we listened and that was the end of the discussion. It was he who stressed education the most to all of us.

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Happy Father’s Day: Whatta Man!

By contributing blogger Dr. LaMarr Edgerson

In the ‘90s there was a well-known female rap group called Salt-N-Pepa who recorded a very popular song entitled “Whatta Man” that eventually reached number 50 on the Billboard R&B Chart in 1993. Currently a favorite commercial of mine is one for Chase bank that features this song. It stars a little girl of about seven or eight who appears to be celebrating her birthday with a princess theme. All the little girls at the party are dressed as princesses when suddenly this big, bearded man enters the scene also dressed as princess. The little girl is overjoyed that her dad showed up dressed as a princess and runs to him with the biggest smile. It is without a doubt a moment she’ll remember for life.

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20 Minutes of Action: 20 Years of Pain

By contributing blogger Dr. LaMarr Edgerson

As I stood in the shower this morning I wondered how many beads of water were falling across my shoulders. I then wondered how many tears have fallen in my office due to the violence experienced from twenty minutes of action. It was impossible to count the number of water droplets that touched my skin. Just as it is impossible to count the number of tears that have fallen in my office as I help victims of violent assault.

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