Breaking the Silence

Website for the American Mental Health Counselors Association's Breaking the Silence initiative to address mental health stigma.


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You Saved My Life

By contributing blogger Dr. LaMarr Edgerson

“You saved my life.” Those were the words she spoke as I looked into her water filled eyes. Those four words sent from the bottom of her heart, touched my soul as we connected on a spiritual level. Silence filled the room as I searched for a proper response. I felt a shiver travel up my spine. My eyes watered slightly from the intensity of the moment – a rarity in my office.  I replied, “You’re welcome. Your life has value and purpose to me.”

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The Winter Blues

By contributing blogger Lorrie McCann

Remember the words to that old Elvis song, “I’ll have a blue Christmas without you”? Did you feel like that this year? Maybe you lost a loved one, got divorced, or moved away from your friends and family; the thought of a jolly holiday and bright new year seems like a distant memory.

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Our Elder Orphans

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

“It’s paradoxical that the idea of living a long life appeals to everyone, but the idea of getting old doesn’t appeal to anyone.” ― Andy Rooney

Yesterday was Christmas Day or at least that’s what the calendar showed. Before 1991, Miss Lib has celebrated Christmas and all the other holidays with her husband and family members. After her husband’s death in 1992, her children left the house. 25 years later, Miss Lib, now 83 yrs old rarely leaves her own home. Coming of age in the Great Depression and WWII, Lib learned self-reliance and fortitude.  Lib’s husband of many years died over two decades ago and her three adult children live over an hour’s drive away and seldom visit.

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Great Expectations

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

It’s that time of year again. That time of year filled with many holiday gatherings, things to do, places to go, and people to see. But now we are here and it’s the holiday season and everyone everywhere is wanting, wishing and hoping for a good time. We often have higher expectations for this season than for any other time of the year. The holiday season of “Great Expectations” can leave us feeling impatient, cranky, and — in some cases — depressed.

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Avoid the “Hurry-Up” Syndrome This Holiday Season

By contributing blogger Dr. Hope Threadgill

Looking for something to do in November? Check out some of the aviation museums near you. November is National Aviation History month.

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Links Between Depression and Anxiety

By contributing blogger Dr. Keith Mobley

In previous blog posts this month, we have discussed depression and anxiety separately since they can be experienced independently and have their own distinct definitions and even diagnostic criteria when one’s functioning is impacted or impaired. However, there is some overlap between anxiety and depression and the two states have a sometimes-complicated relationship. For example, one of the major characteristics of depression is a persistent feeling of sadness or anxiety, which is shared in the list of depression. Also, the physical, somatic symptoms can often overlap.

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Anxiety

By contributing blogger Dr. Keith Mobley

Fear and anxiety are common, every day parts of living. Unknown outcomes of common events, such as interviews, tests, uncomfortable conversations, or just commuting to work have probably evoked those emotions in you sometime this month (if not this week!). However, anxiety can affect the day-to-day functioning and rise to the level of a diagnosable mental disorder for some. Since anxiety is a typical, if not necessary, part of modern life, it can be hard to differentiate typical anxiety that motivates us to perform, stay alert, or make plans to influence an outcome, and the level of anxiety that can reduce ones productivity, diminish the quality of life, affect other ways of coping or behaving, or sometimes be debilitating to an individual.

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