Breaking the Silence

Website for the American Mental Health Counselors Association's Breaking the Silence initiative to address mental health stigma.


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Learning to Forgive Ourselves and Others

from contributing author Dr. Betty Hughes

The purpose of this article is to briefly highlight the importance of forgiveness as part of the counseling process. For many people, learning to forgive may need to come after intensive psychotherapy regarding memories. Forgiveness work may then help to release any remaining negative energy so that the client can learn to function at a healthier level. Holding grievances takes more energy than we realize until we let it go.

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Human Trafficking

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

Would you take a moment and look up the phrase human trafficking on the internet? Don’t be afraid. I promise you the FBI won’t show up at your door and ask any questions.

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You Saved My Life

By contributing blogger Dr. LaMarr Edgerson

“You saved my life.” Those were the words she spoke as I looked into her water filled eyes. Those four words sent from the bottom of her heart, touched my soul as we connected on a spiritual level. Silence filled the room as I searched for a proper response. I felt a shiver travel up my spine. My eyes watered slightly from the intensity of the moment – a rarity in my office.  I replied, “You’re welcome. Your life has value and purpose to me.”

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The Winter Blues

By contributing blogger Lorrie McCann

Remember the words to that old Elvis song, “I’ll have a blue Christmas without you”? Did you feel like that this year? Maybe you lost a loved one, got divorced, or moved away from your friends and family; the thought of a jolly holiday and bright new year seems like a distant memory.

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Our Elder Orphans

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

“It’s paradoxical that the idea of living a long life appeals to everyone, but the idea of getting old doesn’t appeal to anyone.” ― Andy Rooney

Yesterday was Christmas Day or at least that’s what the calendar showed. Before 1991, Miss Lib has celebrated Christmas and all the other holidays with her husband and family members. After her husband’s death in 1992, her children left the house. 25 years later, Miss Lib, now 83 yrs old rarely leaves her own home. Coming of age in the Great Depression and WWII, Lib learned self-reliance and fortitude.  Lib’s husband of many years died over two decades ago and her three adult children live over an hour’s drive away and seldom visit.

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Great Expectations

By contributing blogger Suzanne Walker.

It’s that time of year again. That time of year filled with many holiday gatherings, things to do, places to go, and people to see. But now we are here and it’s the holiday season and everyone everywhere is wanting, wishing and hoping for a good time. We often have higher expectations for this season than for any other time of the year. The holiday season of “Great Expectations” can leave us feeling impatient, cranky, and — in some cases — depressed.

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Thanksgiving and Black Friday

By contributing blogger Dr. Hope Threadgill

Thanksgiving beckons family dinners, football, falling leaves, and Thanksgiving parades. Many watch TV to see the U.S. President “pardon” a turkey, later sent to a zoo, for the National Turkey Federation. Thanksgiving became a holiday in 1863, proclaimed a national holiday on November 26, 1789, and legislatively enacted fourth Thursday of November in 1941. This year the date is November 24th. The idea is to be thankful and appreciate who and what you have in your life.

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